icd 10 code for weakness right lower extremity

(2022) How To Code Lower Extremity Weakness ICD 10 – Codes & Guidelines

Lower extremity weakness ICD 10 coding is made easier with our billing guidelines. This article includes all medical codes you will need to report lower extremity weakness and related specific ICD 10 codes. Read on for a summary of the necessary codes followed by a description.

What Is Lower Extremity Weakness?

Lower limbs are the physical components that stretch from the hips to the toes and comprise muscles, bones, and joints. The leg is a word that is often used to refer to the lower extremities of a person’s body.

There are two thigh joints: one on each knee and one on each tibia or femur. There are two thigh joints on each tibia or femur. Lower-limb weakness or paralysis on one side of the body is uncommon.

Lower limb weakness or paralysis may be caused by a spinal epidural hemorrhage, nerve damage sustained during epidural anesthesia or epidural catheterization, or coagulation issues, among other things.

It is possible to suffer from acute limb paralysis due to several illnesses, including drop attacks caused by a metastatic tumor or an epidural abscess.

Lower Extremity Weakness ICD 10

Lower extremity weakness can be caused due to various reasons, including inactivity, aging, Injury, and even pregnancy. Long-of these additional possibilities include stroke, MS, fibromyalgia, depression, and Long-term chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease might also cause it.

The ICD code for lower extremity weakness is R53.1.

icd 10 code for weakness right lower extremity
Lower Extremity Weakness ICD 10

ICD 10 Code for Lower Extremity Muscle Weakness

if your feet collapse completely or give out due to lower extremity muscle weakness. It is common for leg weakness caused by nerve and muscle problems in the lower body, usually treatable.

A severe medical issue may be the root of the problem and need immediate attention.

The ICD code for lower extremity weakness is M62.81.

ICD 10 CM Code For The Weakness Of Lower Extremity Bilateral

The weakness of the lower extremity bilateral is those parts of the body that go from the hips to the toes. Acute bilateral lower limb paralysis is a medical emergency caused by spinal cord illness.

Paralysis of lower extremities may result from a wide range of systemic conditions, including metabolic and endocrine issues. Lower limb weakness or paralysis is almost often bilateral. However, it may sometimes be unilateral.

The ICD code for the weakness of the lower extremity bilateral is R53.1.

ICD 10 Code For Acute Lower Extremity Weakness

Acute lower extremity weakness is a nerve injury from epidural anesthesia, or epidural catheterization may induce weakness or paralysis in the lower extremities. A spinal epidural hemorrhage can also cause this problem.

Pinch a nerve or have an infection in your urinary system, and you will be weak for the short term (acute). Botulism, pesticide exposure, and shellfish poisoning all can produce weakness. An acute illness may need prompt medical attention if it causes a person to become weak.

The ICD 10 code for acute lower extremity weakness is R53.1. 

ICD 10 Code For Bilateral Lower Extremity Motor Weakness

Bilateral lower extremity motor weakness is a medical emergency caused by spinal cord illness. Paralysis of lower extremities may result from a wide range of systemic conditions, including metabolic and endocrine issues. Various conditions may cause bilateral lower limb edema.

The ICD 10 code for bilateral lower extremity motor weakness is M62.81.

right lower extremity weakness icd 10
ICD 10 Code For Bilateral Lower Extremity Motor Weakness

ICD 10 Code for Diffuse Left Lower Extremity Weakness

Diffuse left lower extremity weakness is a neurological injury, and diseases such as those to the brain, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves may cause hemiparalysis or loss of feeling on one side of the body. TBI may also induce hemiparesis, which can be triggered by a fall, sports injury, or car accident.

ICD 10 code for diffuse left lower extremity weakness is M62.81.

ICD 10 Code for Lower Extremity Weakness Due To Polio

People who have never had polio but have previously had weak muscles might also acquire weakness. Muscle atrophy, or shrinkage, is also possible. Neurological injuries and diseases to the brain, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves may produce hemiparesis or the loss of feeling on one side of the body.

TBI may also result in hemiparesis, which can occur due to a fall, a sports injury, or a car accident. Coughing up blood or discolored phlegm, chest pain, or wheezing are all symptoms you should seek medical attention to right away if you have post-polio syndrome.

Some people with post-polio syndrome become very sensitive to cold temperatures or a sudden drop in temperature due to inadequate blood supply. Because of their sensitivity to cold, people with the post-polio syndrome may need to dress in many layers to stay warm.

The ICD 10 code for lower extremity weakness due to polio is B91.

ICD 10 Code For Lower Extremity Weakness From Stroke

Lower extremity weakness from stroke is one of the most common signs of brainstem stroke; however, it is not always exclusive to the lower extremities. Symptom of the lower limbs may be caused by frontal cortex lesions that significantly influence the contralateral brain.

It is called a “mini-stroke” when a brief ischemic event occurs inside the brain. It is common for patients to feel symptoms such as tingling or numbness in one or both arms or legs before the stroke begins, although this does not always happen.

The ICD 10 code for lower extremity weakness from stroke is I69.349.

icd 10 code for lower extremity weakness
ICD 10 Code For Lower Extremity Weakness From Stroke

What Is Weakness and Fatigue?

Weakness and fatigue are two adjectives that are frequently used interchangeably. They are, however, describing two different emotions. Understanding exactly what “I feel weak” or “I am fatigued” means is critical in helping you and your doctor pinpoint the cause of your symptoms.

As well as a lack of muscular strength, being weak means using more effort to move your limbs, arms, or other muscles. A person may move his or her muscles, but the movement will be painful.

There is nothing wrong with feeling tired or weak. When one’s energy or strength is depleted, they get tired and want to relax, known as being fatigued. An illness, medicine, or a medical procedure such as chemotherapy may all cause this sign to appear.

Overwork, sleep deprivation, worry, boredom, and lack of exercise may be fatigue. Anxiety or grief may also contribute to tiredness and exhaustion in the body.

Symptoms like fatigue and weakness may only be diagnosed when a thorough examination of all other signs and symptoms is completed.

Weakness And Fatigue ICD 10

A general weakness occurs when you do too much activity at once, such as trekking for a lengthy duration. The ache in your muscles may be excruciating, or you may be exhausted and weak. After a few days, these sensations tend to fade.

The term “fatigue” refers to a feeling of tiredness, weariness, or low energy. Overwork, sleep deprivation, worry, boredom, and lack of exercise may cause mild weariness. Any sickness, such as a cold or influenza (flu), may cause fatigue, which usually subsides after the illness is over.

The most common cause of mild exhaustion is a health problem that may be addressed at home without the assistance of a physician.

The ICD code for weakness and fatigue is R53.1.

Generalized Weakness And Fatigue ICD 10

Generalized weakness and fatigue may be caused by various factors, including inactivity, aging, Injury, and even pregnancy. Long-term conditions like diabetes or heart disease might also cause it.

These additional possibilities include stroke, MS, fibromyalgia, depression, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Your muscles may hurt, or you may be exhausted and weak from exhaustion. They usually fade after a few days.

Some cases of generalized muscle weakness may be caused by a problem with the minerals (electrolytes) that are naturally present in the body, such as low levels of potassium or sodium.

The ICD code for generalized weakness and fatigue is R53.1.

ICD 10 Code For Fatigue And Weakness Due To Lisinopril

Lisinopril does not put you to sleep when taken orally. However, it has the potential to cause a drop in blood pressure. This might cause dizziness or fainting. Patients who use blood-pressure medications or diuretics risk electrolyte depletion, leading to a generalized depression of the central nervous system.

Constant side symptoms, including headaches, dry coughs, dizziness, and low blood pressure, will go as soon as you stop taking lisinopril. The same is true for high blood potassium and other brief side effects. In some cases, the side effects fade as treatment advances.

The ICD 10 code for fatigue and weakness due to lisinopril is R53.1.

What Is Arm Weakness?

 Arm weakness is a loss of arm strength and inability to move an arm because of a lack of muscle strength At any given time or throughout an extended period. One or both arms may be affected, and other body parts may also be affected.

In addition to these symptoms, it may also cause soreness in the arms. As a result of arm weakness, you may find it difficult to simply move the affected arm, much less carry out daily tasks.

Identifying the root cause of arm weakness is the best treatment method. Certain scenarios need the use of physical therapy to boost arm strength. The use of painkillers may assist in easing both the arm weakness and the associated discomfort.

Arm Weakness ICD 10

Arm weakness may be a side effect of a general sickness like the common cold. Injury or infection of the arm; muscle atrophy due to certain muscular disorders; nerve injury or compression at the spinal column; and some genetic abnormalities are prevalent causes of arm weakness.

When one side of the body has sudden arm weakness, it’s a true medical emergency known as a stroke.

The ICD code for arm weakness is M62.81.

Left Arm Weakness ICD 10

The earlier you see a doctor, if your left arm aches while you exercise but feels better when you take a break, the better off you are. Edema and excruciating pain result from a quick injury, especially one followed by an audible snap.

Anxiety might cause pain in your left arm. Those who suffer from anxiety disorders may have long-term pain, even if triggered by something as simple as a panic attack or a physical strain. As a disorder, anxiety may be treated.

A doctor may offer counseling, medication, or stress management techniques as a means of aiding you in your recovery.

The ICD code for left arm weakness is M62.81.

Right Arm Weakness ICD 10

Arm weakness may be caused by various factors, including an accident, repetitive strain injury, nerve damage or compression in the neck or upper back, or a circulatory blockage.

Right arms weakness may become suddenly paralyzed if associated with symptoms like a heart attack or stroke. For some people, arm numbness or weakness on one side of the body is the first sign that they are about to have a terrible headache.

The ICD code for right arm weakness is M62.81.

Bilateral Arm Weakness ICD 10

Bilateral arm weakness is an injury or infection of the arm; muscle atrophy due to certain muscular disorders; nerve injury or compression at the spinal column; and some genetic abnormalities are prevalent causes of arm weakness.

Muscle, bone, joint, neurological, or metabolic problems may contribute to arm weakness. Arm weakness may be a symptom of an underlying condition, such as a genetic disorder, or it may be the result of a specific arm injury.

The bilateral arm weakness for ICD 10 is M62.81.

CVA With Right Arm Weakness ICD 10

CVA with right arm weakness occurs after a stroke; it is typical for one or more muscles in the arm or shoulder to be paralyzed or weakened. Tight muscles, rather than weak, maybe experience (spasticity). As a consequence of a stroke, these muscles may become more or less tense.

Tingling or numbness in your arm is another possibility. The shoulder tends to hurt the most in the aftermath of a stroke. In order to establish a shoulder joint, the shoulder blade and upper arm bone must come together.

Ball and socket joints are the most similar in appearance. Shoulder muscle disorders might cause this joint to dislocate partly because of the weight of your arm. As a consequence of the partial separation, your shoulder begins to droop.

The ICD code for CVA with right arm weakness is I69.331.

icd 10 lower extremity weakness
CVA With Right Arm Weakness ICD 10

ICD 10 Code For Left Arm Numbness And Weakness

If you have numbness or weakness in your arms, it might be an indication of something more serious, such as a heart attack or stroke. Because of the risk of cardiovascular disease or a history of the condition, those with inexplicable pain or tingling in their arm should seek immediate medical attention.

There may be an underlying medical ailment that needs physical therapy or surgery if you experience chronic numbness in your arm. Anyone with a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes who develops arm numbness for no apparent cause should seek medical attention.

The ICD 10 code for left arm numbness and weakness is R20.2

Acute Right Arm Weakness ICD 10

Acute right Weakness in the arms may limit the range of motion in your arms, making it difficult to perform daily chores. Arm weakness may be caused by various factors, including an accident blockage and Injury.

The ICD code for acute right arm weakness is M62.81.

Chronic Right Arm Weakness ICD 10

Arm weakness may occur as a side effect of a typical cold. It is common for people to have arm weakness, but it may signify a stroke. In the opinion of experts, it is not unusual for people to have a disparity in the strength of their bodies.

More often than not, the bodies on each side are identical in terms of size and strength. It is not your fault, nor is it the fault of your exercise. After a stroke, patients with sudden right arm weakness should seek immediate medical attention.

The ICD code for chronic right arm weakness is M62.81.

ICD 10 Arm Weakness After Stroke

A stroke may result in the paralysis or weakening of one or more muscles in your arm or shoulder. Muscles may feel strained instead of weak (spasticity). As a consequence of a stroke, these muscles may become more or less tense. Tingling or numbness in your arm is another possibility.

The ICD 10 code for arm weakness after stroke is I69.351.

ICD 10 Code For Left Arm Motor Weakness

You may be experiencing left arm motor weakness, which is a red flag. Paresis or palsy, two other terms for arm weakness, refers to the inability to extend your arms completely.

However, it eliminates paralysis, which is defined as an inability to move arms in any way. However, this might vary depending on the severity of your other symptoms.

The ICD 10 code for left arm motor weakness is M62.81.

What Is Facial Weakness?

Facial paralysis is the medical term for the inability to move one’s face due to nerve damage. The upper and lower faces are affected by facial weakness, which impairs both emotional and volitional facial motions.

If the axon, the nucleus, or the nerve’s periphery is damaged, this may impact all three. There is a chance that your facial muscles could weaken or droop. 

Facial Weakness ICD 10

Face paralysis is often caused by an infection or inflammation of the facial nerve. It might happen on either side of the face.

One side of your mouth may droop due to facial weakness or paralysis, making it harder to maintain saliva there. The condition may make it difficult to close the eye on the affected side of your face.

The ICD code for facial weakness is R29.810.

R29.810
Facial Weakness ICD 10

CVA Left Facial Weakness ICD 10

Strokes to the brain usually induce central facial paralysis, which affects the mouth but not the eye or the forehead. Strokes affecting the brainstem may induce paralysis in the mouth, eye, and forehead, simulating a peripheral lesion.

However, additional localized neurologic abnormalities in these individuals will cause facial weakness.

The ICD code for CVA left facial weakness is I69.392.

Facial Muscle Weakness Paralysis ICD 10

Facial muscles weaken or paralyze for no apparent cause in Bell’s palsy. It begins off mildly and rapidly worsens over the following two days. When the facial nerve is damaged, the seventh cranial nerve develops.

One side of the face or the head is more often affected by pain and discomfort. The inability to move the facial muscles on one or both sides is referred to as “facial paralysis.”

These include congenital (existing since birth) problems like cerebral palsy and congenital (existing since birth) trauma or sicknesses like stroke and brain tumor.

The ICD 10 code for facial muscle weakness paralysis is R29.810.

Facial Nerve Weakness ICD 10

Face nerve paralysis, or facial nerve weakness, refers to the inability to control the muscles that control facial expressions, such as smiling, blinking, and other facial movements.

It is common for one side of the face to be affected by a case of facial paralysis. Potentially, this illness might make it difficult for people to communicate their emotions.

The ICD 10 code for facial nerve weakness is R29.810.

Facial Weakness Following Cerebral Infarction ICD 10

In stroke patients, facial palsy is facial weakness following cerebral infarction caused by damage to the facial nerve in the brain. An ischemic stroke damages brain tissue and neurons because of oxygen.

A hemorrhage after a stroke may put much pressure on nearby tissues and nerves.

The ICD 10 code for facial weakness following cerebral infarction is I69.392.

I69.392
Facial Weakness Following Cerebral Infarction ICD 10

ICD 10 For Facial and Bulbar Weakness

When the lower motor neurons in the medulla are damaged at the nuclear or fascicular level, or when the lower cranial nerves outside of the brain stem are damaged bilaterally, bulbar weakness, also known as bulbar palsy, occurs.

The facial and bulbar weaknesses include difficulty swallowing, a weak jaw and facial muscles, as well as a gradual decline in the ability to speak.

Another symptom is a less obvious weakness in the arms and legs and fits of laughter or weeping called emotional lability.

The ICD 10 code for facial and bulbar weakness is R29.810

What Is Hand Weakness?

Diseases such as arthritis can cause weakness in the hands. Even simple tasks might be more difficult with a weaker grip or hand. A loss of grip strength may indicate muscular atrophy or shrinking.

Hand and finger disuse is the most prevalent cause, although it may also signify other conditions such as MS, Parkinson’s disease, peripheral neuropathy, and cervical compression.

Hand Weakness ICD 10

If one or both of your hands feel “heavy” or “weak,” there might be a multitude of causes. The possibility of a stroke, which is a major medical emergency, should be considered carefully if one has sudden hand weakness.

Hand weakness that persists over time is not usually indicative of severe medical disease and is not life-threatening. Hand weakness that lasts weeks or months is frequently the result of a medical issue that may be treated.

The underlying cause will worsen if the weakness is not treated.

The ICD 10 code for hand weakness is R53.1.

Left Hand Weakness ICD 10

Left-Hand weakness may be a bothersome symptom of nerve compression or tendon damage in the hand. Other causes of hand weakness consist of inflammation of the hand joints, a disorder known as tennis or golfer’s elbow, or a hand injury.

The ICD 10 code for left hand weakness is R53.1.

ICD 10 Code For Bilateral Hand Weakness

Bilateral hand weakness after a partial anterior spinal artery region infarction is a less well-known consequence of the condition.

The anterior horn cell area is particularly susceptible to hypoperfusion because it is located in the most distally perfused segment of the anterior spinal artery territory. A potential side effect might be crippling hand atrophy and weakening due to your actions.

ICD 10 code for bilateral hand weakness is R53.1.

ICD 10 Code Right Hand Weakness

People who have had a stroke are more likely to develop problems with their right hands than others. Proper care of the hand after a stroke may help alleviate these problems.

The prevention of future problems may also be aided by it. After a stroke, it is essential to use methods like proper positioning while caring for the hand.

There is a stroke when an area of the brain is starved for oxygen, resulting in brain damage. In some instances, an ischemic stroke or a brain hemorrhage might cause a clot in a blood artery in your brain (hemorrhagic stroke).

As a consequence, some of the brain cells die.

The ICD 10 code right hand weakness is R53.1

Left Hand Weakness and Numbness ICD 10

Numbness may be caused by issues with your brain or spinal cord in rare circumstances, but arm or hand weakness or loss of function can also occur.

Damage, inflammation, or compression of one of the nerves or a branch of one of the nerves in your arm and wrist might produce hand numbness.

Numbness may also be caused by diseases that damage the peripheral nerves, such as diabetes; however, comparable symptoms usually appear first in the feet with diabetes.

Numbness is not always linked to potentially life-threatening conditions like strokes or malignancies.

To determine the source of your numbness, your doctor will require specific information about your symptoms. Before proper therapy may begin, a range of tests may be required to confirm the reason.

The ICD code for left hand weakness and numbness is R53.1.

CVA With Left Hand Weakness ICD 10

Some stroke victims regain full use of their left arms within a few weeks of their illness. Getting your arms treated may be something you want to keep doing.

Your medical team may customize a treatment plan based on your individual needs and wishes.

ICD 10 Chronic Left Hand Weakness

If your left arm is completely paralyzed, you will only be able to sense a tingling sensation, and it is chronic left hand weakness. You may also have arm weakness as a result of this treatment.

There are several possible causes of numbness in the arm, from sleeping on it the wrong way to a heart attack. There are a wide variety of therapy alternatives.

Get medical attention immediately if you notice numbness in addition to any other severe symptoms.

The ICD 10 code for chronic left hand weakness is R53.1.

What Is Deconditioning and Weakness?

Deconditioning refers to the physical changes that occur after a period of inactivity. Changes occur in all three of these organs. As a result, they cause exhaustion and exhaustion and restrict your ability to be active.

Because of deconditioning, acts that require the use of a muscle’s maximum strength need a more significant proportion of that muscle’s maximum strength. The activity will become impossible if you lose any more muscle strength.

It can become dependent on others if little muscle function is lost due to illness, such as a few days of inactivity.

Weakness and Deconditioning ICD 10

Deconditioning is a term used to describe the reversible changes in the body caused by inactivity and disuse. Muscular strength loss is the most common and fundamental aspect of deconditioning.

What matters is how increases in muscular strength affect daily activities, not the other way around.

The ICD 10 code for weakness and deconditioning is Z72.3.

Z72.3
Weakness and Deconditioning ICD 10

Generalized Weakness and Deconditioning ICD 10

Muscle inefficiency is a common cause of skeletal muscle weakening (deconditioning). Muscles, bones, and even the mind weaken fast in those who do not engage in regular physical activity.

If you lead a sedentary (or inactive) lifestyle, this might result from generalized weakness and deconditioning. When muscles are not being used, fat replaces some muscular fibers. 

The ICD 10 code for generalized weakness and deconditioning is Z72.3.

Related ICD 10 Codes For Weakness

For more information about the following related ICD 10 codes for weakness, please follow the links below.

Left Sided Weakness – G81.94
Left Sided Weakness After Stroke – I69.354
Left Sided Numbness And Weakness – R20.2
Left Sided Weakness Unspecified – G81.94
TIA With Left Sided Weakness – Z86.73
Late Effect CVA Left Sided Weakness – I69.354
Transient Left Sided Weakness – G81.94
Acute Ischemic Stroke With Left Sided Weakness – I69.354
Acute Left Sided Weakness – G81.94

Acute Onset Left Sided Weakness Arm and Leg – R53.1
Acute Onset Left Sided Weakness – I69.354
Cerebral Infarction With Left Sided Weakness – I69.354
Cerebral Palsy With Left Sided Weakness – G80.2
Cerebrovascular Accident With Left Sided Weakness – I69.354
Chronic Left Sided Weakness – G81.94
CVA With Left Sided Nondominant Weakness – I69.354
CVA With Left Sided Residual Weakness – I69.354
Leg Weakness – M62.81

Left Leg Weakness – M62.81
Right Leg Weakness – M62.81
Bilateral Leg Weakness – M62.81
Lower Leg Weakness – IM62.81
Left Leg Weakness After Stroke – I69.349
Muscle Weakness In Legs – M62.81
Abnormal Gait Weakness Legs – R26.89
Acute Left Leg Weakness – M62.81
Chronic Left Leg Weakness – M62.81
Right Sided Weakness – G81.91
CVA With Right Sided Weakness – I69.351
Late Effect CVA Right Sided Weakness – I69.351
Tia With Right Sided Weakness – G45.9
Cerebrovascular Accident With Right Sided Weakness – I69.351
CVA With Residual Right Sided Weakness – I69.351

Weakness – R53.1
Extremity Weakness – M62.81
Pelvic Floor Weakness – N81.84
Shoulder Weakness – M62.81
Hip Weakness – R53.1
Neurological Weakness – R53.1
Abdominal Weakness – M62.81
Weakness And Deconditioning – Z72.3
Transient Weakness – R53.1
Left Knee Weakness – M25.362
Vestibular Weakness – H81.90
Chronic Weakness – R53.1
Unilateral Weakness – G81.94
Bulbar Weakness – G12.22
Neck Weakness – M62.81
Weakness Due To Chemotherapy – R53.0
Ankle Weakness – M25.372
Core Weakness – M62.81

Dizziness And Weakness – R42
Finger Weakness – R53.1
Functional Weakness – TR53.1
Generalized Weakness – M62.81
General Body Weakness – M62.81
Generalized Weakness And Debility – R53.1
Severe Generalized Weakness – M62.81
Acute Generalized Weakness – M62.81
Chronic Generalized Weakness – M62.81
CVA With Generalized Weakness – I69.359
Episode Of Generalized Weakness – M62.81
Muscle Weakness – M62.81
Muscle Weakness Generalized – M62.81
Lower Extremity Muscle Weakness – M62.81
Facial Muscle Weakness – R29.810

Abnormal Gait Due To Muscle Weakness – R26.89
Eye Muscle Weakness – H05.829
Neck Muscle Weakness – M62.81
Pelvic Floor Muscle Weakness – N81.84
Proximal Muscle Weakness – M62.81
Respiratory Muscle Weakness – M62.81

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