Certain Zoonotic Viral Diseases – Definitions & ICD 11 Codes

Coded Elsewhere:

  • COVID-19, virus identified (RA01.0)

Filovirus Disease

Definition of Filovirus Disease: A severe disease with high lethality caused by filovirus infection. Filovirus disease is typically characterised by acute onset of fever with non-specific symptoms/signs (e.g., abdominal pain, anorexia, fatigue, malaise, myalgia, sore throat) usually followed several days later by nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and occasionally a variable rash. Hiccups may occur. Severe illness may include haemorrhagic manifestations (e.g., bleeding from puncture sites, ecchymoses, petechiae, visceral effusions), encephalopathy, shock/hypotension, multi-organ failure, spontaneous abortion in pregnant women when infected. Common laboratory findings include thrombocytopenia, elevated transaminase concentrations, electrolyte abnormalities, and signs of renal dysfunction. Individuals who recover may experience prolonged sequelae (e.g., arthralgia, neurocognitive dysfunction, uveitis sometimes followed by cataract formation), and clinical and subclinical persistent infection may occur in immune-privileged compartments (e.g., CNS, eyes, testes). Person-to-person transmission occurs by direct contact with blood, other bodily fluids, organs, or contaminated surfaces and materials with risk beginning at the onset of clinical signs and increasing with disease severity. Family members, sexual contacts, healthcare providers, and participants in burial ceremonies with direct contact with the deceased are at particular risk. The incubation period typically is 7–11 days (range ≈2–21 days).

ICD 11 Code For Filovirus Disease

  1D60  Filovirus disease

1D60.0 Ebola disease

Definition of Ebola disease: A severe disease with high case fatality caused by infection with Ebola virus or a closely related virus. Ebola disease is typically characterised by acute onset of fever with non-specific symptoms/signs (e.g., abdominal pain, anorexia, fatigue, malaise, myalgia, sore throat) usually followed several days later by nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and occasionally a variable rash. Hiccups may occur. Severe illness may include haemorrhagic manifestations (e.g., bleeding from puncture sites, ecchymoses, petechiae, visceral effusions), encephalopathy, shock/hypotension, multi-organ failure, spontaneous abortion in infected pregnant women. Common laboratory findings include thrombocytopenia, elevated transaminase concentrations, electrolyte abnormalities, and signs of renal dysfunction. Individuals who recover may experience prolonged sequelae (e.g., arthralgia, neurocognitive dysfunction, uveitis sometimes followed by cataract formation), and clinical and subclinical persistent infection may occur in immune-privileged compartments (e.g., CNS, eyes, testes). Person-to-person transmission occurs by direct contact with blood, other bodily fluids, organs, or contaminated surfaces and materials with risk beginning at the onset of clinical signs and increasing with disease severity. Family members, sexual contacts, healthcare providers, and participants in burial ceremonies with direct contact with the deceased are at particular risk. The incubation period typically is 7–11 days (range ≈2–21 days).

1D60.00 Bundibugyo virus disease

Definition of Bundibugyo virus disease: Ebola disease caused by Bundibugyo virus.

1D60.01 Ebola virus disease

Definition of Ebola virus disease: Ebola disease caused by Ebola virus.

1D60.02 Sudan virus disease

Definition of Sudan virus disease: Ebola disease caused by Sudan virus.

1D60.03 Atypical Ebola disease

Coding Note:

  • This code should be used in conjunction with codes that identify the causative virus. Unusual manifestations of disease include organ-specific (e.g. meningoencephalitis) or systemic inflammatory syndromes associated with viral recrudescence occurring after clinical recovery from acute disease. These manifestations may occur several months following infection. Additionally, this code may be used for unusual presentations of acute disease not included in the general description of Ebola disease.

1D60.0Y Other specified Ebola disease

1D60.0Z Ebola disease virus unspecified

1D60.1 Marburg disease

Definition of Marburg disease: A severe disease with high case fatality caused by infection with Marburg virus or a closely related virus. Marburg disease is typically characterised by acute onset of fever with non-specific symptoms/signs (e.g., abdominal pain, anorexia, fatigue, malaise, myalgia, sore throat) usually followed several days later by nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and occasionally a variable rash. Severe illness may include haemorrhagic manifestations (e.g., bleeding from puncture sites, ecchymoses, petechiae, visceral effusions), encephalopathy, shock/hypotension, multi-organ failure. Common laboratory findings include thrombocytopenia, elevated transaminase concentrations, electrolyte abnormalities, and signs of renal dysfunction. Individuals who recover may experience prolonged sequelae (e.g., arthralgia, neurocognitive dysfunction, uveitis), and clinical and subclinical persistent infection may occur in immune-privileged compartments (e.g., CNS, eyes, testes). Person-to-person transmission occurs by direct contact with blood, other bodily fluids, organs, or contaminated surfaces and materials with risk beginning at the onset of clinical signs and increasing with disease severity. Family members, sexual contacts, healthcare providers, and participants in burial ceremonies with direct contact with the deceased are at particular risk. The incubation period typically is 7–11 days (range ≈2–21 days).

1D60.10 Marburg virus disease

Definition of Marburg virus disease: Marburg disease caused by Marburg virus or Ravn virus.

1D60.11 Atypical Marburg disease

Coding Note:

  • This code should be used in conjunction with codes that identify the causative virus. Unusual manifestations of disease include organ-specific (e.g. orchitis, uveitis) or systemic inflammatory syndromes associated with viral recrudescence occurring after clinical recovery from acute disease. These manifestations may occur several months following infection. Additionally, this code may be used for unusual presentations of acute disease not included in the general description of Marburg disease.

1D60.1Y Other specified Marburg disease

1D60.1Z Marburg disease virus unspecified

1D60.Y Other specified filovirus disease

1D60.Z Filovirus disease virus unspecified

Arenavirus Disease

ICD 11 Code For Arenavirus Disease

  1D61  Arenavirus disease

Coded Elsewhere:

1D61.0 Argentinian haemorrhagic fever

Definition of Argentinian haemorrhagic fever: A disease endemic to the Argentine Pampas that is caused by an infection with Junín virus and that is characterised by haemorrhagic and neurological manifestations and high lethality (10-30%). The disease begins with a 6-14 day-lasting prodromic phase. Argentinian haemorrhagic fever presents with fever, myalgia, erythema, conjunctival injection, non-menstrual uterine bleeding, epistaxis, haematemesis, melena, haematuria, or shock. Around 20-30% of patients advance to a neurological and haemorrhagic phase. Survivors have a long convalescence period. Transmission occurs by inhalation, consumption, or direct contact with excretions and bodily fluids from infected rodents. Diagnosis occurs by identification of Junín virus from blood or mucosal secretions samples.

1D61.1 Bolivian haemorrhagic fever

Definition of Bolivian haemorrhagic fever: A disease endemic to Bolivia that is caused by an infection with Machupo virus. Early disease symptoms/signs include fever, mild hypertension, headache, bleeding gums, and fatigue. Advanced signs include mucous membrane haemorrhage, epistaxis, melena, and neurological damage such as tremors, seizures, loss of muscle control, and coma. Onset of disease symptoms occur usually within seven days of infection. The lethality ranges from 18% to 22%. Transmission occurs by inhalation, consumption, or direct contact with excretions and bodily fluids from infected rodents. Diagnosis occurs by identification of Machupo virus from blood or mucosal secretions samples.

1D61.2 Lassa fever

Definition of Lassa fever: A disease endemic in large parts of sub-Saharan Western Africa caused by infection with Lassa virus. Infection is mild or asymptomatic in most cases, but can cause severe illness or death. After a prodromal period of 7-10 days (sometimes longer), initial symptoms/signs include fever, malaise, headache, sore throat, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhoea. Subsequently, patients develop high fever, extreme lethargy, oedema of head/neck, encephalopathy, pleural effusion, and ascites. Bleeding into the skin, mucosae and underlying tissues occurs in the severest cases. Deafness occurs in many patients, and the disease is often particularly severe in pregnancy. The overall lethality can reach 15% even among hospitalized patients receiving supportive care. Transmission occurs by inhalation, consumption, or direct contact with excretions and bodily fluids from infected rodents. Diagnosis occurs by identification of Lassa virus in blood samples by molecular or serologic methods.

1D61.3 Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever

Definition of Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever: A disease mainly found in rural areas of central Venezuelan that is caused by an infection with Guanarito virus. Symptoms/signs among patients include fever, malaise, headache, arthralgia, sore throat, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, convulsions, and a variety of haemorrhagic manifestations. The majority of patients also develop leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. The overall lethality may reach 30% even in hospitalized patients receiving supportive care. Transmission occurs by by inhalation, consumption, or direct contact with excretions and bodily fluids from infected rodents. Diagnosis occurs by identification of Guanarito virus from blood or mucosal secretions samples.

1D61.Y Other specified arenavirus disease

1D61.Z Arenavirus disease unspecified

Hantavirus Disease

Definition of Hantavirus Disease: An acute zoonotic viral disease characterised by abrupt onset of fever, influenza-like clinical signs (e.g., chills, headache, myalgia, dry cough), gastrointestinal signs (e.g., diffuse abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhoea), transient troubled vision (acute myopia), lumbalgia due to renal swelling, haemorrhagic manifestations to various degrees sometimes followed by rapidly increasing dyspnoea due to not-cardiogenic acute lung oedema, and/or renal involvement. The latter is characterised by initial, often massive proteinuria and microhaematuria sometimes accompanied by transient renal function impediment. All hantavirus infections are heralded by varying degrees of transient thrombocytopenia, which may serve as an indicator of clinical severity.

ICD 11 Code For Hantavirus Disease

  1D62  Hantavirus disease

1D62.0 Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

Definition of Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: Acute zoonotic viral disease with abrupt onset of fever, lower back pain, varying degrees of haemorrhagic manifestations, and renal involvement caused by certain hantaviruses.

Inclusions:

  • Nephropathia epidemica

1D62.1 Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Definition of Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome: A disease of the respiratory system, caused by infection with certain hantaviruses. This disease is characterised by fever, fatigue, myalgia, headache, chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, or abdominal pain. This disease may also present with coughing and dyspnoea. Transmission is by the faecal-oral route or airborne transmission.

1D62.2 Atypical hantavirus disease

1D62.Y Other specified hantavirus disease

1D62.Z Hantavirus disease unspecified

Henipavirus Encephalitis

Definition of Henipavirus Encephalitis: Acute bat-borne disease characterised by fever and headaches. The disease may progress to drowsiness, disorientation, mental confusion, and finally encephalitis (brain swelling) in less than a week. This progression may occur with or without an acute respiratory distress component. The incubation period ranges from 4 to 14 days. Lethality is high.

ICD 11 Code For Henipavirus Encephalitis

  1D63  Henipavirus encephalitis

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

Definition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: A disease caused by an infection with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoA). This disease is characterised by severe acute respiratory illness with fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Confirmation is by identification of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus from genetic material.

ICD 11 Code For Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

  1D64  Middle East respiratory syndrome

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

Definition of Severe acute respiratory syndrome: A disease of the respiratory system, caused by an infection with coronavirus. This disease is characterised by fever, headache, cough, myalgia, tachycardia, or diarrhoea. This disease may also lead to pneumonia. Transmission is by direct contact, inhalation of infected respiratory secretions, or airborne transmission. Confirmation is by identification of coronavirus in a blood, stool, respiratory secretions, or body tissue sample.

ICD 11 Code For Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

  1D65  Severe acute respiratory syndrome

Exclusions:

  • COVID-19, virus identified (RA01.0)
  • COVID-19, virus not identified (RA01.1)

Other Specified Zoonotic Viral Diseases

ICD 11 Code For Other Specified Zoonotic Viral Diseases

  1D6Y  Other specified zoonotic viral diseases

Zoonotic Viral Disease Virus Unspecified

ICD 11 Code For Zoonotic Viral Disease Virus Unspecified

  1D6Z  Zoonotic viral disease virus unspecified

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