6D10, 6D11,

Personality Disorders & Related Traits – ICD 11 Codes

Coded Elsewhere:

Personality disorder

Definition of Personality disorder: Personality disorder is characterised by problems in functioning of aspects of the self (e.g., identity, self-worth, accuracy of self-view, self-direction), and/or interpersonal dysfunction (e.g., ability to develop and maintain close and mutually satisfying relationships, ability to understand others’ perspectives and to manage conflict in relationships) that have persisted over an extended period of time (e.g., 2 years or more). The disturbance is manifest in patterns of cognition, emotional experience, emotional expression, and behaviour that are maladaptive (e.g., inflexible or poorly regulated) and is manifest across a range of personal and social situations (i.e., is not limited to specific relationships or social roles). The patterns of behaviour characterizing the disturbance are not developmentally appropriate and cannot be explained primarily by social or cultural factors, including socio-political conflict. The disturbance is associated with substantial distress or significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning.

ICD 11 Code For Personality disorder

  6D10  Personality disorder

6D10.0 Mild personality disorder

Definition of Mild personality disorder: All general diagnostic requirements for Personality Disorder are met. Disturbances affect some areas of personality functioning but not others (e.g., problems with self-direction in the absence of problems with stability and coherence of identity or self-worth), and may not be apparent in some contexts. There are problems in many interpersonal relationships and/or in performance of expected occupational and social roles, but some relationships are maintained and/or some roles carried out. Specific manifestations of personality disturbances are generally of mild severity. Mild Personality Disorder is typically not associated with substantial harm to self or others, but may be associated with substantial distress or with impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning that is either limited to circumscribed areas (e.g., romantic relationships; employment) or present in more areas but milder.

6D10.1 Moderate personality disorder

Definition of Moderate personality disorder: All general diagnostic requirements for Personality Disorder are met. Disturbances affect multiple areas of personality functioning (e.g., identity or sense of self, ability to form intimate relationships, ability to control impulses and modulate behaviour). However, some areas of personality functioning may be relatively less affected. There are marked problems in most interpersonal relationships and the performance of most expected social and occupational roles are compromised to some degree. Relationships are likely to be characterised by conflict, avoidance, withdrawal, or extreme dependency (e.g., few friendships maintained, persistent conflict in work relationships and consequent occupational problems, romantic relationships characterised by serious disruption or inappropriate submissiveness). Specific manifestations of personality disturbance are generally of moderate severity. Moderate Personality Disorder is sometimes associated with harm to self or others, and is associated with marked impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning, although functioning in circumscribed areas may be maintained.

6D10.2 Severe personality disorder

Definition of Severe personality disorder: All general diagnostic requirements for Personality Disorder are met. There are severe disturbances in functioning of the self (e.g., sense of self may be so unstable that individuals report not having a sense of who they are or so rigid that they refuse to participate in any but an extremely narrow range of situations; self view may be characterised by self-contempt or be grandiose or highly eccentric). Problems in interpersonal functioning seriously affect virtually all relationships and the ability and willingness to perform expected social and occupational roles is absent or severely compromised. Specific manifestations of personality disturbance are severe and affect most, if not all, areas of personality functioning. Severe Personality Disorder is often associated with harm to self or others, and is associated with severe impairment in all or nearly all areas of life, including personal, family, social, educational, occupational, and other important areas of functioning.

6D10.Z Personality disorder severity unspecified

Prominent personality traits or patterns

Definition of Prominent personality traits or patterns: Trait domain qualifiers may be applied to Personality Disorders or Personality Difficulty to describe the characteristics of the individual’s personality that are most prominent and that contribute to personality disturbance. Trait domains are continuous with normal personality characteristics in individuals who do not have Personality Disorder or Personality Difficulty. Trait domains are not diagnostic categories, but rather represent a set of dimensions that correspond to the underlying structure of personality. As many trait domain qualifiers may be applied as necessary to describe personality functioning. Individuals with more severe personality disturbance tend to have a greater number of prominent trait domains.

ICD 11 Code For Prominent personality traits or patterns

  6D11  Prominent personality traits or patterns

6D11.0 Negative affectivity in personality disorder or personality difficulty

Definition of Negative affectivity in personality disorder or personality difficulty: The core feature of the Negative Affectivity trait domain is the tendency to experience a broad range of negative emotions. Common manifestations of Negative Affectivity, not all of which may be present in a given individual at a given time, include: experiencing a broad range of negative emotions with a frequency and intensity out of proportion to the situation; emotional lability and poor emotion regulation; negativistic attitudes; low self-esteem and self-confidence; and mistrustfulness.

Coding Note:

  • This category should ONLY be used in combination with a Personality disorder category (Mild, Moderate, or Severe) or Personality difficulty.

6D11.1 Detachment in personality disorder or personality difficulty

Definition of Detachment in personality disorder or personality difficulty: The core feature of the Detachment trait domain is the tendency to maintain interpersonal distance (social detachment) and emotional distance (emotional detachment). Common manifestations of Detachment, not all of which may be present in a given individual at a given time, include: social detachment (avoidance of social interactions, lack of friendships, and avoidance of intimacy); and emotional detachment (reserve, aloofness, and limited emotional expression and experience).

Coding Note:

  • This category should ONLY be used in combination with a Personality disorder category (Mild, Moderate, or Severe) or Personality difficulty.

6D11.2 Dissociality in personality disorder or personality difficulty

Definition of Dissociality in personality disorder or personality difficulty: The core feature of the Dissociality trait domain is disregard for the rights and feelings of others, encompassing both self-centeredness and lack of empathy. Common manifestations of Dissociality, not all of which may be present in a given individual at a given time, include: self-centeredness (e.g., sense of entitlement, expectation of others’ admiration, positive or negative attention-seeking behaviours, concern with one’s own needs, desires and comfort and not those of others); and lack of empathy (i.e., indifference to whether one’s actions inconvenience hurt others, which may include being deceptive, manipulative, and exploitative of others, being mean and physically aggressive, callousness in response to others’ suffering, and ruthlessness in obtaining one’s goals).

Coding Note:

  • This category should ONLY be used in combination with a Personality disorder category (Mild, Moderate, or Severe) or Personality difficulty.

6D11.3 Disinhibition in personality disorder or personality difficulty

Definition of Disinhibition in personality disorder or personality difficulty: The core feature of the Disinhibition trait domain is the tendency to act rashly based on immediate external or internal stimuli (i.e., sensations, emotions, thoughts), without consideration of potential negative consequences. Common manifestations of Disinhibition, not all of which may be present in a given individual at a given time, include: impulsivity; distractibility; irresponsibility; recklessness; and lack of planning.

Coding Note:

  • This category should ONLY be used in combination with a Personality disorder category (Mild, Moderate, or Severe) or Personality difficulty.

6D11.4 Anankastia in personality disorder or personality difficulty

Definition of Anankastia in personality disorder or personality difficulty: The core feature of the Anankastia trait domain is a narrow focus on one’s rigid standard of perfection and of right and wrong, and on controlling one’s own and others’ behaviour and controlling situations to ensure conformity to these standards. Common manifestations of Anankastia, not all of which may be present in a given individual at a given time, include: perfectionism (e.g., concern with social rules, obligations, and norms of right and wrong, scrupulous attention to detail, rigid, systematic, day-to-day routines, hyper-scheduling and planfulness, emphasis on organisation, orderliness, and neatness); and emotional and behavioural constraint (e.g., rigid control over emotional expression, stubbornness and inflexibility, risk-avoidance, perseveration, and deliberativeness).

Coding Note:

  • This category should ONLY be used in combination with a Personality disorder category (Mild, Moderate, or Severe) or Personality difficulty.

6D11.5 Borderline pattern

Definition of Borderline pattern: The Borderline pattern descriptor may be applied to individuals whose pattern of personality disturbance is characterised by a pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity, as indicated by many of the following: Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment; A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships; Identity disturbance, manifested in markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self; A tendency to act rashly in states of high negative affect, leading to potentially self-damaging behaviours; Recurrent episodes of self-harm; Emotional instability due to marked reactivity of mood; Chronic feelings of emptiness; Inappropriate intense anger or difficulty controlling anger; Transient dissociative symptoms or psychotic-like features in situations of high affective arousal.

Coding Note:

  • This category should ONLY be used in combination with a Personality disorder category (Mild, Moderate, or Severe) or Personality difficulty.

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