Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10, Distal Radius Fracture, icd 10 Distal Radius Fracture

(2022) How To Code Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 – List With Codes & Guidelines

This article will outline the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and the ICD 10 CM code for Distal Radius Fracture.

Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 Causes

Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10, or wrist fractures, can happen to people with healthy or unhealthy bones. Healthy bones are able to withstand strong force, but the impact on the wrist weakens the bone.

The risk of distal radial fracture is increased in people with osteoporosis, a weakened bone condition that has not suffered a slight fall. Broken wrists occur in traumas, car accidents and motorcycle accidents. They can also be the result of a fall, when a patient stretches out his arm and breaks the fall.

Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 Symptoms

In most Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10, the signs of serious injury in this area are obvious. Broken wrists can be more severe than others, but the most common signs of a fracture in the distal radius are severe pain.

A broken wrist is characterized by swelling. In some cases, swelling may become so severe that it is difficult or impossible to move the injured hand or wrist. There may be tingling in the fingertips and limited finger movement.

Depending on the severity of the fracture, physical manifestations of the injury may occur. For example, bones can get out of kilter and the patient’s wrist may appear deformed. The following symptoms are signs of a Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10:

  • immediate pain, as if an accident had occurred
  • the fracture is accompanied by a sound or feel of fracture
  • the patient may experience abnormal swelling or tenderness in the wrist that may worsen into numbness, which does not allow the patient to move his fingers or his hand
  • a deformed forearm or wrist

Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 Diagnosis

The doctor follows a three-step procedure to diagnose a Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10.

Imaging

Imaging is the most reliable method for diagnosing a distal radial fracture. The doctor may use other imaging methods under certain circumstances. He or she can order an X-ray of the wrist from multiple angles. The doctor can manipulate the wrist and ask the patient to perform certain hand and wrist movements until he is able to do so.

MRI and CT

MRI and CT scans are helpful for examining complex fractures and looking for additional injuries to nearby soft tissue. MRI and CT are performed with injected contrast dyes called MRI arthrograms or CT arthrograms, which can help damage ligaments and other soft tissues. Bone scans and scintigraphy tests, which detect metabolic changes in the bone after fractures, are also helpful for hard-to-see bone structures.

Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 Treatment

The decision to treat a Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 depends on many factors. For example:

  • fracture displacement (when the broken bone is displaced)
  • crushing of the fracture in several places
  • joint involvement in connection with ulnar fractures
  • injury to the median nerve
  • whether it is a dominant occupation of the hand or activity of the patient

In some cases, immediate fracture treatment is the use of a splint for comfort and pain control. If the fracture is shifted, it can be reduced in size or moved into the correct position before being placed in the splint.

If the Distal Radius Fracture ICD 10 is in a good position, a splint or plaster can be inserted. Fracture reduction can be performed under local anesthesia, which means that the painful area is anesthetized. Non-surgical treatment is also an option. This can serve as a last resort until the fracture is fully healed.

The patient receives a detachable wrist splint that can be worn for comfort and support. The cast will remain in place for up to six weeks. When the plaster is removed, the patient begins physical therapy to regain the function and strength of the wrist.

X-rays are taken after three weeks and six weeks if the fracture has been reduced in size and is considered unstable. If the displaced fracture is aligned, plaster, splint or plaster can be applied. X-rays can be taken if the bone has not been reduced in size or is considered stable. If there is a displaced fracture that needs to be corrected.

An orthopaedic surgeon will assess the fracture and decide if the patient needs surgery or whether the fracture can be treated for up to six weeks with a cast. Another option is surgery for distal radial fractures. With this option, the fracture is considered unstable and is not treated with plaster. Once the reduction is complete, it can be performed under local anesthesia.

The operation is performed with an incision in the volar area of the patient’s wrist, where the doctor can feel his pulse. This allows full access to the pause. The parts are assembled and fixed with one or more plates and screws. In certain cases, a second incision in the wrist is required to restore anatomy.

Plate screws are used to hold the piece in place. If several pieces of bone are present, fixation with plate screws may not be possible. In this case, an external fixator and additional wires can be used to secure the fracture. Once the fixator is inside, most of the hardware remains in the body.

After the operation, a splint is put on for two weeks and the patient receives a follow-up visit. The patient wears a removable wrist splint for four weeks. At the next check-up, the splint is removed and replaced with the external fixator. Patients begin physical therapy on their first visit to the clinic in order to regain wrist function and strength. Six weeks after the operation, the patient will no longer wear the removable splint.

The patient can continue to exercise as prescribed by the surgeon or therapist. Early exercise is key to a good recovery after surgery.

ICD 10 Code For Distal Radius Fracture

ICD 10 CM S52 Fracture of forearm
ICD 10 CM S52.0
Fracture of upper end of ulna
ICD 10 CM S52.00
Fracture of upper end of ulna closed
ICD 10 CM S52.01 Fracture of upper end of ulna open
ICD 10 CM S52.1 Fracture of upper end of radius
ICD 10 CM S52.10 Fracture of upper end of radius closed
ICD 10 CM S52.11 Fracture of upper end of radius open
CD 10 CM S52.2 Fracture of shaft of ulna
ICD 10 CM S52.20 Fracture of shaft of ulna closed
ICD 10 CM S52.21 Fracture of shaft of ulna open
ICD 10 CM S52.3 Fracture of shaft of radius
ICD 10 CM S52.30 Fracture of shaft of radius closed
ICD 10 CM S52.31 Fracture of shaft of radius open
ICD 10 CM S52.4 Fracture of shafts of both ulna and radius
ICD 10 CM S52.41 Fracture of shafts of both ulna and radius closed
ICD 10 CM S52.5 Fracture of lower end of radius
ICD 10 CM S52.50 Fracture of lower end of radius closed
ICD 10 CM S52.51 Fracture of lower end of radius open
ICD 10 CM S52.6 Fracture of lower end of both ulna and radius
ICD 10 CM S52.60 Fracture of lower end of both ulna and radius closed
ICD 10 CM S52.61 Fracture of lower end of both ulna and radius open

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